News Release

International Women's Day opportunity to recognise impact of dementia on women

London, 8 March 2016

Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) will use ‘International Women’s Day’ on Tuesday, 8th March to highlight the disproportionate impact of dementia on women across the world. The ADI report ‘Women and Dementia: A global research review’, published in June 2015, reveals how women are much more likely to be affected by dementia than men. The majority of people living with the disease and those most at risk of developing dementia are women, and women account for an overwhelming majority of caregivers and health professionals.

On ’International Women’s Day’ 2016, ADI will be using this focus on women’s experiences globally to highlight statistics and quotes from the report, drawing attention to the importance of improved public health and care policies that support women in all aspects of their dementia journey.

The report provides an overview of international research from all over the world, highlighting the need for a broader, evidence based approach to female-targeted dementia health programmes in low and middle income countries, where female-led family caring remains the predominant care model. ADI estimates that by 2050, 71% of the 135 million people with dementia will live in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The report also suggests that women all over the world are much less likely to access help and support than their male counterparts.

There is a need for further research into the impact of dementia on women specifically. There continues to be only limited research involving women with dementia as participants which focus on the gender issues of living with dementia, highlighting a continued need in 2016 to provide tailored information and support to better enable women to provide care, and to feel cared for themselves.

Marc Wortmann, Executive Director of Alzheimer’s Disease International, states:

“There is a growing need for governments across the world to acknowledge that the challenges faced by women affected by dementia are part of the wider scope of women’s issues that need addressing, especially in low and middle income countries. We must take action immediately to develop public health and care policies that support women in all aspects of their dementia journey, whether it is as a caregiver or as someone living with dementia themselves.”

The ADI report ‘Women and Dementia: A global research review’ was supported by grants from Red & Yellow Care and WomenAgainstAlzheimer’s.