New report reveals disproportionate impact of dementia on women

5 June 2015 - Our new report reveals how women are much more likely to be affected by dementia than men. The majority of people living with the disease and those most at risk of developing dementia are women, and women account for an overwhelming majority of caregivers and health professionals.

Women and Dementia: A global research review provides an overview of international research from all over the world, highlighting the need for a broader, evidence based approach to female-targeted dementia health programmes in low and middle income countries, where female-led family caring remains the predominant care model.

ADI estimates that by 2050, 71% of the 135 million people with dementia will live in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The vast majority of these people will be cared for at home, most likely by a female relative. The report outlines the numerous socio-economic and domestic challenges facing women living in LMICs and suggests that women all over the world are much less likely to access help and support than their male counterparts.

The report also highlights the experiences of female caregiving in high income countries, and calls on policy makers to integrate better support systems for LGBTI females. 

In light of this research, ADI is urging all countries to acknowledge and address the disproportionate impact of dementia on women, and to provide tailored information provision and support to better enable women to provide care and to feel cared for themselves.

Read the report here.