Alzheimer's Award for psychosocial interventions

For four years, the Fondation Médéric Alzheimer and ADI ran the Alzheimer's Awards for evidence-based psychosocial interventions for people with dementia and their carers.

Psychosocial research involves or relates to both the social and psychological aspects of a patient's life. Often this includes the relationship between the personal, internal environment and the wider social world, such as the influence of social and environmental factors on an individual's state of mind or behaviour. This type of research is aimed at supporting and enhancing the quality of life of people with Alzheimer’s disease and their carers.

The primary Alzheimer’s Award was given for the best evidence-based psychosocial intervention and was intended to be used for dissemination of the research findings to a broad range of organisations and people involved in dementia treatment and care worldwide and in several languages. The amount of the award for the best psychosocial intervention was €18,000.

An Alzheimer’s Award was given for the most promising evidence-based psychosocial intervention and was intended to be used to further implement a project that has already shown some results but that needs more thorough evaluation. The amount of the award for the most promising psychosocial intervention was €7,000.

2011 award winners

The Fondation Médéric Alzheimer and ADI ran the Alzheimer's Award for evidence-based psychosocial interventions and most promising interventions for people with Alzheimer's Disease and their carers.

Prof Lynn Chenoweth from Australia was awarded the prize for best evidence-based psychosocial intervention for her project, 'PerCEN : Person-centred environment and care for residents with dementia: a cost effective way of improving quality of life and quality of care?'

The award for most promising award was presented to Dr Radha S Murthy from India for her intervention, 'The effect of culture based comprehensive psychosocial care program on outcomes in residential patients with dementia - An Indigenous Model'.

Prof Chenoweth and Dr Murthy were presented with their awards during the 27th International Conference of Alzheimer's Disease International in London, UK in March 2012.

2010 award winner

Prof Sube Banerjee of the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London received the award of €18000 for the best evidence-based psychosocial intervention for his study 'The Croydon Memory Service Model – early and effective diagnosis and intervention for all'.

Prof Banerjee was presented with his award during the 26th International Conference of Alzheimer's Disease International in Toronto, Canada in March 2011.

2009 award winners

The award of €18000 for best evidence-based intervention was presented to Dr Amit Dias of the Goa Medical College in India. His intervention, entitled 'Effectiveness of a community based psychosocial intervention for supporting people with dementia and their caregivers in developing countries', has been carried out in Goa with people with mild to moderate dementia and their carers.

The €7000 award for the most promising evidence-based psychosocial intervention went to Anne Margriet Pot of the Free University in Amsterdam, Netherlands, for her project 'Mastery over Dementia: an innovative e-mental health intervention for family caregivers of people with dementia'. Mastery over Dementia is an online intervention for family carers of people with dementia.

2008 award winners

Mary Mittelman received the prize for her proposal 'Translating the NYU Caregiver Intervention from Research to Practise Settings'. An additional prize for the most innovative psychosocial intervention was awarded to Danny George for his submission, 'Can Intergenerational Volunteering Promote Quality of Life for Persons with Mild to Moderate Dementia?'